Publication: Scientific evidence changes prescribing practice-a comparison of the management of the climacteric and use of hormone replacement therapy among Swedish gynaecologists in 1996 and 2003. Br J Obstet Gynaecol 2006:113(1):15-20

Scientific evidence changes prescribing practice-a comparison of the management of the climacteric and use of hormone replacement therapy among Swedish gynaecologists in 1996 and 2003. Br J Obstet Gynaecol 2006:113(1):15-20.
Thunell L, Milsom I, Schmidt J, Mattsson L.
Br J Obstet Gynaecol 2006:113:6.

Abstract

Objectives:

To study changes in attitudes, knowledge and management strategies concerning hormone replacement therapy (HRT) among gynaecologists in Sweden.

Design:

Comparative questionnaire study.

Setting:

National survey.

Population:

Practising gynaecologists.

Methods:

In 1996, gynaecologists in Sweden (n= 1323) were invited to return a postal questionnaire concerning their attitudes, knowledge and management strategies concerning HRT. They were also asked about their own use of HRT. In 2003, a similar questionnaire was sent to practising gynaecologists (n= 1320) in Sweden.

Main Outcome Measures:

Attitudes to and personal use of HRT.

Results:

The response rate was 76% in 2003 when 11% of the gynaecologists thought that all women without contraindications should be offered HRT compared with 44% in 1996 and 89% found it difficult to evaluate pros and cons with HRT in a clinical situation (74% in 1996). More gynaecologists in 2003 believed that HRT increased the risk for breast cancer (95% vs 71%). Twenty-five percent in 2003 stated that risk factors for osteoporosis were absolute indications for HRT (60% in 1996). Current ischaemic heart disease was considered to be an indication for HRT by 7% in 2003 (60% in 1996). In 2003, current use of HRT was reported by 71% of female menopausal gynaecologists (88% in 1996).

Conclusions:

Swedish gynaecologists were more cautious in their management strategies concerning HRT in 2003 compared with 1996, probably influenced by results from the Heart and Estrogen/Progestin Replacement Study (HERS) and Women's Health Initiative (WHI) studies. Current use of HRT was still high among female gynaecologists, although it had decreased since 1996.

Pmid:

16398765 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


, from FoU i Västra Götalandsregionen
http://www.researchweb.org/is/vgr/user/publication?ref=29861